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9 Financially Toxic People You are Probably Friends With

Financially toxic people exist and while you might not be friends with them, you might have encountered one of them at some point in time.

These people show up in different kinds of relationships, from friendships and family to work and romantic partnerships.

Being aware of the role the people in your life play in your finances is very important. Are they looking out for you or trying to get you to make bad money decisions?

If they are financially toxic, cutting them off might not be your first choice but identifying them is a great step in the right direction.

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Halo Invest gives you access to the best financial insights, insider tips and tools to help you improve your relationship with money.

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1. The Moocher

If you have a friend who’s constantly coming over to borrow your stuff or calling you to lend them some urgent 2k which they never return or pay back, you are in a financially toxic relationship with a moocher.

Now, it’s totally okay for your friends to borrow things or for you to be generous, but what happens when they exploit your generosity for their own good?

A moocher has made it a habit to borrow without paying back or because they believe you don’t mind. The worst part? The moocher can afford to pay their own bills or use their own things but they feel a lot better about taking advantage of others so they don’t have to spend their money.

2. The Competitor

Ever met someone who always seems to be in competition with you or others even when there is no competition? If yes, well, you just might have met a competitor also known as a one-upper.

When it comes to being financially toxic, a competitor is always in your face trying to earn bragging rights for their achievements.

Let’s just say you’re having a conversation with your colleagues about how you just moved into your new apartment, the one-upper will mention how they just bought a new house. He/she is always trying to impress others and move the attention to themselves.

They do it so well, that sometimes we tend to get dragged into their competitiveness and start living above our means or buying things we don’t need to look better than the one-upper.

Don’t. Just don’t.

3. The Show-Off

If you’re like most people, then you probably love sharing your big wins with your friends, family, colleagues or partner because you want them to share in your happiness. The case is entirely different for the show-off.

A show-off takes pride in buying the most expensive cars, designer clothes and going on trips just so they can rub it in people’s faces. They do this to make themself feel better or to show that they are doing well.

If you know someone like this, try not to feel down or like you aren’t doing well for yourself. Focus on building your finances instead of getting envious.

4. The Lazybones

A lazybones is not willing to put in any work to make their own money. He or she would rather live off other people, whether it be their parents, siblings, partner, or friends.

Once they get too comfortable with living like this, it’s almost impossible to get them to change. As a financially toxic person, a lazybones’ unproductiveness tends to rub off on others and can also affect your pocket.

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5. The Gossip

This financially toxic person finds it hard to ever mind their business. They want to know your financial situation, from how much you are earning to how much you paid for your new car.

It’s a totally different story if sharing this information isn’t an issue for you, but gossips take pleasure in prying into other people’s business so they can use that as gossip material. They love to fill other people in on your business so they can compare theirs with yours or criticize you.

It’s important to watch out for people like that as their intentions are never pure or genuine like a true friend.

6. The Over-Giver

Now there’s absolutely nothing wrong with being generous. What makes an over-giver financially toxic? Their excessive spending. An over-giver is always willing and able to spend their last dime on you.

They will go above and beyond when it comes to gifting presents on special occasions like birthdays or Christmas. An over giver always insists on paying the cab fare and will rather cover everyone’s bill than allow it to be split.

We all love not having to spend our own money, but what happens when their actions which might not be intentional make you feel indebted to them? You feel like you owe the over-giver and must gift them something better on their birthday even though you can’t afford to.

They might not be as financially toxic as others, but their actions might make you feel emotionally in debt.

7. The Guilt Tripper

Now there are two types of guilt trippers, the one that judges you for spending too much and the one that judges you for not spending at all.

What makes either one so financially toxic? They want to monitor your spending habits.

It’s okay if your friends want to help you put your spending habits in check or if you have a gambling issue or habit of investing your money into bad businesses, but generally, it’s no one’s business how you decide to spend your money.

You work hard for your money and you shouldn’t be judged by how you spend it if what you buy makes you happy. If you decide you’re not one to splurge on items you can’t afford all in the name of living an expensive lifestyle that’s not yours, no friend of yours should make you feel bad about it.

8. The Clown

Everything seems to be funny to this friend and that includes your income.

There are those friends, family, or even partners who make it a habit of publicly making fun of other people’s salary in order to make themself feel better. This can be seen to be very disrespectful and even affect your relationship with them.

Be careful to share such information with this person or better still, confront them when they try to make fun of you.

9. The Know-it-all

This person swears they know everything when it comes to finances and is ever ready to give you some form of financial advice that will lead you to make bad money decisions.

They aren’t qualified to advise you on your finances and they give advice even when it’s not asked for.

If you ever decide to take advice from this friend, make sure you fact-check what they are saying first and be careful so you don’t run into trouble or debt.

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Which of these financially toxic people do you have in your corner or have you experienced being around with? Let us know in the comment section. Share this article and read more like it here.

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LifeStyle

4 Nigerian Couples On Dealing With Financial Stress

Conversations about money are not the easiest thing to have, especially with a romantic partner. In today’s article, 4 Nigerian couples open up and talk about how they handle financial stress in their relationships.

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Victor and Oyin Akpan

Married for 5 years

Oyin and Victor met back in 2006. Oyin had just completed her JAMB and WAEC exams and was visiting a friend at Covenant University which was where she met Victor for the first time and their friendship eventually blossomed into a relationship. They are married with two beautiful children.

Do you talk about money in your relationship?

Oyin: We do. We used to talk about money even when we were dating.

What kind of conversations do you have about money?

Victor: Mostly about bills, and when we want to plan for investments, savings, future plans, and children’s school fees.

How do you approach managing your finances together?

Victor: We obviously know our strengths and weaknesses. I am more of the spender and my wife is a saver, so she’s the one that manages our joint account. I literally don’t want to mess that up. So, we have a joint account for the big bills and another for groceries.

Have you ever had any heated conversations about money?

Victor: Money has never been an issue. Most of the time, it’s really just us having conversations to reevaluate how much we get to spend compared to what needs to be saved.

Oyin: What has really saved us from having heated conversations was the fact that we had been friends for a very long time and we knew what we were like about money. He’s usually about us going out and having fun but I’m a bit wary about spending money. So we play on each other’s strengths and weaknesses to make decisions around spending.

Being transparent about our finances really helped us when we started dating even though it was a hard conversation to have. Knowing how much we made back when we were both earning 60,000 naira and living in Abuja helped us decide how to allocate money better. So, transparency has taken out the guesswork of arguing about money.

That’s great! What’s one thing you spend a lot of money on together?

Oyin: Well, asides from rent, we tend to spend a lot of money on groceries and food.

What’s the best/most expensive gift you have both gotten each other since you’ve been together?

Oyin: Wow. This is a lot. We are talking anniversary, Valentine, Christmas, Father’s day, and Mother’s day gifts.

My favourite gift was a beautiful ring he gifted me from a trip he went on in Dubai while were still dating. I still have the ring. Two years before we got married, he got me a pretty Swatch watch on Valentine’s day. The most expensive gift would be a gold chain he got me in 2008 before we even started dating.

Most of our gifting decisions are based on emotions and necessity.

He got me plants for my birthday last year which was something that I wanted. It also helped me out of a depression I was having at the time.

Victor: We don’t really do expensive, we look at what we need and decide based on that to gift each other.

What financial advice would you give to other couples?

Victor: Don’t borrow. That’s one law that I have stuck with. Borrowing can put you in serious debt which can lead to depression and a lot of headaches.

Oyin: We avoid taking loans and make do with what we have which has really helped us. I lost my job last year and my husband wasn’t working because of the lockdown and restaurants being shut down. So, we had to get smart about how we were spending and buy things in bulk. Be sensitive enough to know when you’re spending a lot and when you need to cut down on your spending. Also, know your partner and how they relate to money.

Very important! What are your long term financial goals as a couple?

Victor: She is more proactive about planning our finances, so I leave it to her to do most of it and then we discuss what works for us

Oyin: I would say that he’s actually been very involved in the process. One of our goals would be to get into real estate. We have talked about owning properties and turning them into flats to rent out.

We have also discussed opening up a restaurant because Victor’s a chef, so that’s a major investment for us.

Victor is a chef and runs @chowstation_ng. He also trains in continental dishes and mixology. If you’re looking for a private chef for your private dining and small get-togethers, you can contact him on Instagram @chef_isie

Oyin is into interior design, planting, and blogging. You can also reach out to her on Instagram if you’re in need of a Social Media Strategist @oyinva

Tomiwa and Dawn Immanuel

Together for 3 years. Married for one year

Dawn caught Tomiwa’s attention when he saw her singing on a mutual friend’s Instagram story. The mutual friend talked to Dawn a couple of times to try and “sell Tomiwa’s market”. After which, they eventually started following each other on Instagram and didn’t meet until a year later.

They got talking and he invited her to church. From there, they started seeing more of each other.

Do you talk about money in your relationship? What kind of conversations do you have?

Tomiwa: Yes, we do.

Dawn: Basically, we started out having conversations to get to know who’s the better saver, who’s worse at saving, or who’s the spender in the relationship. These conversations were one of those things that were important to me when we were dating.

I want to know that you won’t embezzle funds. Lol. So I was initiating the conversation early but Tomiwa was a bit locked up about it at first. I would ask how much he has left from his salary and he’d be like ‘Why are you asking that question?’

So, it’s mostly about how much do we have, what can we afford at the moment? How do we build what we have now and make more money.

What would you say your approach is in managing your finances right now?

Tomiwa: After coming to the point of having honest conversations about money, we decided that she is probably better at managing money.

Dawn: We didn’t decide, we found out that I was better. But go on.

Tomiwa: We have an account that most of our money comes into, so I installed the app on her phone and logged in that account so she can manage it. I still make transactions via USSD code and other means but she gets to monitor all of that so we can account for what I spend money on because I tend to spend…

Dawn: Impulsively

Seems like that’s a thing in a lot of relationships. The guys spend a lot.

Dawn: And it’s funny because people always say ladies like money. We like money to keep!

Tomiwa: You say that because that’s your experience. Some other relationships have it the other way round.

Very true. Have you two ever had any heated conversations about money?

Dawn: We don’t have heated conversations like that.

Tomiwa: Yeah we don’t. The most heated conversations we have probably had were the ones that led up to the point of me admitting that maybe I really am a frivolous spender who needs…

Dawn: Saving. See what I did there?

Lmao. So what’s one thing you spend a lot of money on together?

Dawn and Tomiwa: Food.

Aha! Everyone seems to agree on that! But anyway, food is expensive. What’s the best/most expensive gift you have both gotten each other?

Dawn: The best gift Tomiwa has gotten me was a phone. It’s the best because it came when I really needed it. I just got robbed then and my phone was stolen.

A week or two later, he invited me over to his place and told me to close my eyes. Nollywood style. Lol. He dropped the phone on the bed and when I picked it up and I was like ‘oh wow’. Well, he said I cried, I don’t remember that part. Lol.

Tomiwa: She didn’t even go ‘wow’ she just started crying. There were tears.

That’s really sweet.

Tomiwa: I try you know. For our one year anniversary, she did a week-long countdown to the date and I was getting gifts every day for 7 days. She got me this lovely casual two-piece attire. I really loved it and still do.

It ties with a pair of chelsea boots she got me as well but the atmosphere under which she gifted me the two-piece gives it an edge.

I love the 7-day countdown. What financial advice do you have for other couples or those who are single?

Tomiwa: Be open about your finances because you don’t know what help you would need from your partner in making better choices. I never would have thought it was something I needed to do to become a better spender. I opened up to Dawn completely while we started dating and it’s gotten better now that we are married.

Cultivate the habit of transparency in your finances. With the way our society is developed and the patriarchy, a lot of men still don’t think they should be telling their wives these things. Having these conversations is another interesting way to practice transparency in every relationship.

Dawn: My advice would go to the single person trying to figure out their finances. Focus more on sticking to your budget than actually saving your money. Saving won’t really matter if you aren’t sticking to your budget.

What are your long-term financial goals as a couple?

Tomiwa: Ah! O por gan!

Dawn: Mine would be to have enough money for my kids, especially for their education because I grew up in a house where I struggled to go to school. I never want my child(ren) to have to experience that. I want us to be able to afford to take them to good schools.

Tomiwa: I agree. For me, It’s generally being able to afford everything good that I would want to give my family.

Tomiwa is a talented voice-over artist and is available to take on projects that will help bring your scripts or ads to life. Follow him on Twitter @TomiwaImmanuel

Dawn is a well-experienced editor, so if you’re looking to edit your book, you can reach out to her on Twitter @Dawn_Immanuel

*Emeka and Temi

Dating for 1 year and 3 months

Emeka and Temi met each other on a mutual friend’s group chat. Temi had just joined the group and Emeka was on the list of people her friend suggested she might like to talk to. They finally got to see each other at a hangout on the beach and that was the start of a beautiful relationship.

What kind of conversations do you have about money?

Temi: Ah, we need to blow o, because money is very important. We don’t exactly manage our finances together. We don’t have a joint account or anything but we make sure that we’re both getting the knowledge we need to be able to boost our finances individually so that when we eventually get married in the future, it will be better for both of us.

Emeka: To add to what Temi has said, we’re very transparent with where we are. We both know how much we earn and try our best to be transparent about how much we spend.

Love it! Have you had any heated conversations about money before?

Emeka and Temi: Nope. Never.

What’s one thing you spend a lot of money on together?

Emeka: Food and gifts

Talking about gifts, what’s the best or most expensive gift you’ve both gotten each other since you’ve been together?

Temi: I would say perfume. But the best were mules. I was so happy about those pair of shoes because they are so easy to wear. I’ve been wearing them a lot since he got them for me. In this case, I need another one. Thanks.

Emeka: Mad o. You got it!

For me, I think the most expensive were these pair of suede Chelsea boots. Mad stuff. It was really nice.

"The best gift Temi got me was also the first gift she ever got me, it wasn't for any occasion." – Emeka Click To Tweet

She gave me a fountain pen, the kind you dip in ink, like in those classic vintage movies. It was so thoughtful because I like pens and pads. According to her, she walked into a store, saw it and knew I would like it.

I still have it, I like to use it once in a while.

That’s really cute. Off the top of your minds, what’s a very interesting money conversation you have both had in the past?

Emeka: There was a time I was in a bit of debt and it was very hard but I had to have a conversation with Temi. No one wants to be in situations like that but I realized it was a conversation I had to have.

There was no point keeping it to myself because honesty, openness, and transparency are core values of our relationship.

It was a tough conversation to have but we had it and thankfully that debt is clear. So, we are good.

Temi, how would you say you handled that particular situation?

Emeka: Do you remember?

Temi: Yes na. I understood that it wasn’t an easy conversation for him to have. I mean, debt is a part of life.

It was important for me to know what led to him incurring those debts. You know, for finances, incurring debt is not a problem, it’s about what you are incurring debts towards. Are you incurring debts because you want to buy things or be lavish? Was it a need, or because you want to finance or boost a project? It was totally fine finding out that Emeka didn’t get into debts for any outlandish reasons.

Do you have any financial advice for other couples out there?

Emeka: Omo, I think I would say you guys read o. As in, read and acquire knowledge. You might think you know it all already when it comes to saving and think it’s just money, ‘I know how to save. I will budget’. But you still need to read.

For the past 3 months, the information I have been exposed to has really shifted my mind. Honestly, you really don’t know how much you don’t know until you start to learn.

Like I always say, have conversations, be open with your friends and those you trust because no matter how big your eyes are, you can’t see the back of your head, so you need to get perspective from as many wise and trusted people as possible.

Abi, Temi, have I said anything out of place?

Temi: Not at all, you’re speaking for both of us, babe.

What are your long-term financial goals as a couple?

Emeka: We want to lowo, we want to layo, we want to la laafia.

Temi: Abi! That’s it!

Emeka: So, our long term goal is to be financially free. That’s a bit vague, but to break it down. We plan to have investments in businesses and own property. It’s important that we are able to afford everything that we want to get and that we can give as generously as possible.

Temi: You can look at us as investors. In the sense that we aim to work, have as many sources of income as we can, increase them as we grow, and then invest our money in various opportunities like stocks, property. and definitely cryptocurrency.

Becoming angel visitors or getting into Venture Capital are also goals we would like to make happen in the future.

*Kunle and Nike

Dating for 4 years and 8 months

Kunle and Nike first noticed each other at an ATM queue in the university. Nike had withdrawn some cash to get something to eat at a stall but was unable to get change from the seller. Kunle who had just stopped by at a pharmacy noticed Nike again with the seller and offered to pay for her. She refused at first but later accepted and they exchanged numbers after.

Do you talk about money in your relationship?

Kunle: Ah! A whole lot, Nike likes money like mad and can talk about money from morning till night. All she talks about is money.

Nike: LMAO. wow.

What kind of conversations do you have about money and how do you manage your finances together?

Kunle: Omo. I thank God for my babe. She’s the one who manages most of our finances. She’s always talking about investments and has helped me so far. I allow her to manage my finances because she’s better at managing finances than I am. I have a very picky…

Temi: …flamboyant lifestyle

Kunle: Lol. She’s right. It’s easier to let her manage finances. She’s always upfront and has never scammed me. So, we are fine.

Nike: Lmao. So you think I would scam you.

We mostly talk about knowing how and where to keep money that comes in, like investments. what percentage to put in. A sane amount not insane. Lol because he likes spending money like a mad man.

Kunle: Lol, so make I no wear good cloth, make I wear rag abi?

Nike: Lmao. We also save for the future and for rainy days.

Haha. You two are hilarious. Have you ever had any heated conversations about money?

Nike: Ah, we had one yesterday now.

Lmao. Yesterday? Would you like to share?

Nike: Kunle had already spent way more than he should have spent for the week. Apparently, he needed money for something urgent but I didn’t even calm down to hear what he needed it for. I started ranting saying I honestly want to know if he is mad. Then he made me realize that something came up and he needed to clear some bills.

Most of the time, his overspending habit is the cause of the heated conversations we have about money.

Lmao. Everything comes down to you, Kunle.

Kunle: Haha. I don’t even know what to say but yeah she’s 80% right.

Nike doesn’t want me to spend money or get used to having it.

Nike: That’s what he thinks. He thinks because I’m Ijebu -Well, we are actually both Ijebu – that I’m always strict with spending because I simply don’t like spending but that’s not true, I just don’t want to end up stranded. Although I must confess, I also spend money on some stupid things sometimes.

Aha. So you’re almost as guilty. What’s one thing you spend a lot of money on together?

Nike: Maybe food?

Kunle: Food and Data.

I think food is a major cost in every relationship.

Kunle: Ah, Nike’s own is different. It’s one of a kind.

What’s the best or most expensive gift you’ve both gotten each other?

Kunle: The best gift was a jar of words she got me. She told me to pick one out every day and read. It had 365 days worth of sweet notes written on colourful paper. The most expensive would be a tank top and shorts.

Nike: Wow. Lmao. Well, I don’t really think I have spent money on him, not like I would like to because I don’t really have money like that. Right now, I’m pretty good with giving thoughtful gifts like the jar of words.

The best gift he has gotten me was three different wigs all at once. The most expensive is most likely the phone that I’m currently using.

Love to see it! What financial advice do you have for other couples out there?

Nike: First and foremost, have more than three streams of income so you don’t get broke. Secondly, have savings that you won’t touch. Thirdly, I feel if you aren’t financially stable enough with at least even one stream of income to sustain you, I don’t think it’s advisable to rush into a relationship. Kunle, do you have anything to add?

Kunle: You’ve already given advice for the both of us. You didn’t even give me a chance to say anything before you said ‘first and foremost’. Lol.

So what are your long-term financial goals as a couple?

Kunle: Omo. E plenty.

Nike: Well, one of them would be not having to think about the cost of things before getting them and also having enough money to fall back on without having to consider the cost of things before we spend. Also having investments that come with sensible returns on a short or long-term basis.

Do you have an interesting story of a personal experience you will like to share or be interviewed on? Reach out to us at social@haloasset.ng

We keep our interviewees’ names anonymous on request.

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Gen Z versus Millennials in Nigeria: Who has a better relationship with money?

Gen Z and millennials in Nigeria have totally different views and opinions on a lot of things and when it comes to money, it’s no different. We got a couple of people from both generations to share what their relationship with money is like and here’s what they had to say.

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Halo Invest gives you access to the best financial insights, insider tips and tools to help you improve your relationship with money.

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Ife, 22.

I feel like as I get older I’m more understanding and can relate to how millennials are with money.

I used to absolutely resent my uncles or aunties for not sending me money back then. But now that I have people calling me ‘aunty’ and sending their account numbers, I just want to let uncle Seyi know that I understand what it feels like now. 😭😭

Fidel, 26.

“Who’s better with money?” you ask. Who are the people at the helm of emerging fintech companies?

Look at the CEOs and Founders of Paystack, PiggyVest, CowryWise, Bamboo, BuyCoins. Are they millennials or Gen Z? 🌚What money do Gen Z people even have apart from pocket money?

The Z in Gen Z stands for Zero funds.

Adanne, 28.

As a millennial, I’m a lot more careful with money. Most of my Gen Z friends are “careful with money” too but they are the ones always pushing for breakfast at Cactus or hang out at Backyard Lagos. I’m not saying it’s wrong but I personally make a lot of plans before I can make that sort of decision.

I feel like that phrase “problem no dey finish” was created by a Gen Z because we millennials have problems and the list is inexhaustible, we no dey too enjoy life and we reason our problems before thinking of enjoyment.

When I was a lot younger, I used to be really stingy with money, and after asking people for money when I was broke, I would splurge the money on rubbish. Right now, as a millennial earning money, I’m a lot more giving with money. I allow myself to spend money better. My life of abundance mantra is that there’s always more.

Ifeoluwa, 27.

It’s not that I think Gen Z people are wasteful or too careless and carefree with money but I also know that they aren’t as strict as most of us millennials are. The circumstances of our lives are quite different.

Members of Gen Z still live in their parent’s house, at least most of them, with exceptions. On the other hand, we millennials are over here hustling with house rent, food, and so much to deal with. In fact if your fridge spoils, you will nearly run mad. You now think that we are the same. Please, dear.

Dami, 31.

Firstly I’m not sure Gen Z have a relationship with money. With the way they dye their hair and spend on loud, you’d think they have found the goose that laid the golden egg but they are rather like Goldilocks patrolling timelines sniffing for quick 2k.

Sodiq, 26.

Compared to when I was in the Gen Z age bracket, I would say I’m a lot conscious about my spending since I no longer depend on my parents. Even though I don’t have investments right now, I try to save more and spend less.

I was basically spending money as it came in when I was younger because I didn’t have so much responsibilities to worry about.

When I’m not a child that I would be spending based on vibes and my feelings.

Nene, 21.

All I do is save, spend and save again. Money is meant to be spent abeg. My relationship with money isn’t great but I try my best.

Wande, 22.

Nigerian millennials only know how to shout save! save! save! But how do you save when the money you’re making isn’t even enough to take care of you?

They talk about how one person either bought a car or house, meanwhile, we Gen Z’ers are trying to manage the little money we are earning and keep up with what’s going on. But yeah, saving is still important.

Damola, 25.

So there is a certain ‘condition make crayfish bend’ that hasn’t happened to the average Gen Z. I don’t want to say they’ve not really experienced life but on some level they haven’t.

The millennials were also just like Gen Z, leeching on their parents and older siblings/cousins, with the exception of the firstborn whose condition made crayfish bend much earlier.

They are thrust into an abyss of responsibility that forces them to be smarter with money, to be more money management conscious. Most Gen Z have not gotten that rude awakening. The ones that have were also thrust into the real, unforgiving world a lot earlier than their peers.

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What are your thoughts? Who do you think spends more money, Nigerian Gen Z’ers or Nigerian millennials? Leave a comment.

If you enjoyed this article, then please share and read more like this here.

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Quizzes & Trivia

Quiz: Love or Money? Find Out What’s in Your Future

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LifeStyle

The 5 Types of Money Personalities as Romantic Partners

The 5 different money personalities behave differently as romantic partners.

Do you ever wonder why your romantic partner is the way they are with money? Or do you get curious about how a potential romantic partner will act in money-related situations?

Perhaps you are in a relationship where your partner likes to overspend on things you don’t consider necessities. Or they calculate every single kobo.

Well, a romantic partner’s money personality plays a major role in how they manage, handle and talk about money when in a relationship.

1. The Helper

This is the sweetest and most generous of all money personalities. As a romantic partner, when it comes down to being financially available for the person they love, the helper is always right where you need them.

If you had a lifetime of debts to pay off, the helper would probably risk it all to make sure it’s taken care of even if they don’t have enough for themselves.

Anyone would be lucky to have this money personality as a partner but the only problem is…

They’re more than generous to anyone and everyone. They don’t know how to say no to anyone who asks for help, to the detriment of their finances.

Their habit of putting the needs of others before theirs tends to put a strain on their relationships. Especially when their partners have opposite money personalities.

And when they are with helpers just like them? Bye, bye finances.

If your partner is a helper, you might want to consider slowly easing them into saving and investing. Help them understand how to make better money decisions. Generosity should not be at the detriment of your personal finances.

The Spender

If your romantic partner is a spender then you’re used to your partner’s impulsive spending habits.

They enjoy the good things of life and they believe money is meant to be spent. And when they see something they want, they go for it, no holds barred.

As a romantic partner, a Big Spender is great at gift-giving and spontaneous surprises. Their goal is to match their relationship with the expensive lifestyle they live. Click To Tweet

A spender might give off the traits and behaviours of an impulse buyer, so you might want to watch out for those. Impulse buyers are often unable to save for the future, they also tend to fall into debt quite often.

If you’re in a relationship with a spender, you should consider showing them ways in which they can build a savings culture.

The Debtor

This money personality certainly has a lot going on and that mostly involves being in debt on a steady. Debtors make it a habit of spending more than they earn.

As a romantic partner, they often guilt trip you or find new ways to get you to loan them some money. It’s the usual – “I just need urgent 2k” behaviour that gets them into debt as they go hopping from one friend to another to borrow money.

The sad part about it is they end up finding it difficult to pay back. The debtor probably even spends lavishly on you with money he/she has borrowed off from someone.

The truth about the debtor is that they lack control of their finances, and put no effort into knowing where their money goes. On a brighter note, a debtor can get out of debt by simply tracking and controlling their expenses, paying back in bits, and not spending above their means or getting a higher paying job.

Once they can do this, they can then go-ahead to start investing for their future so as not to fall into the debt hole again. The debtor can make a lot of progress with the help of their romantic partner, friends and family.

The Speculator

If there’s one great benefit of having the speculator as a romantic partner, it’s how they can rub off on you to start investing.

The speculator is very fond of jumping from one investment to another. They are always in search of the next best way to make money without considering the risks.

Whether it’s a Ponzi scheme like MMM, putting money in a friend’s business, real estate investment or diversifying their stocks and getting into the crypto market, the speculator has tried it all. They are on a never-ending race to try anything new that pops up, so long as they can make money off it.

As your romantic partner, there’s so much you can learn from them when it comes to investments. They can be very greedy about earning returns on investment but they are sometimes willing to share new knowledge with their partner.

The Saver

If you had to look at two sides of a coin, the spender would be on one side and the saver on the other. You can regard the saver as the King or Queen of stockpiling money because that’s what they do best.

Having a saver as a romantic partner doesn’t always have to mean getting inexpensive gifts on those special occasions.

But when it comes to going out on frequent expensive dates, they might tell you there is rice at home.

This is because they would rather save the money or go somewhere less expensive than spend it on things that they deem unnecessary.

They enjoy tracking their expenses to a T and they pay close attention to their monthly financial statement. A Saver is very big on living a conservative lifestyle and it shows well in their relationships too. You probably want to focus on getting your partner to get into investing but at least you can never catch them being in debt.

Which of these money personalities do you see signs of your current partner in? Have you had any of them as a romantic partner before? What money personalities do you think work best as romantic partners based on your experience?

We would love to hear from you in the comments😉


If you enjoyed reading how the 5 types of money personalities behave as Romantic Partners, take this quiz to find out what money personality is your love match!